Sunday, September 26, 2010

Yellow Pages

Who needs the yellow pages when you have the internet, I smuggly thought as I threw away every phone book in the house a while back. You know who needs one - the person who's dryer stops working  with two loads of wet laundry and is in deseparate need of a laundry mat. Because laudry mats aren't big on the internet or I am in big trouble...

4 comments:

kenady said...

so glad i'm not the only one who didn't think we needed phone books:) thank goodness hubby told me to stick it!

Scientific Housewife said...

I wish they would stop wasting trees and accept the fact that no one uses phonebooks anymore.

kenc said...

@Housewife: don't worry, no trees are being impacted because of phone books.

While the popular myth is that the industry is responsible for the neutering of forests, the reality is the Yellow Pages industry doesn’t knock down any trees for its paper!!! Let me repeat that – they don’t need to cut any trees for their paper supply. Currently, on average, most publishers are using about 40% recycled material (from the newspapers and magazines you are recycling curbside), and the other 60% comes from wood chips and waste products of the lumber industry. If you take a round tree and make square or rectangular lumber from it, you get plenty of chips and other waste. Those by-products make up the other 60% of the raw material needed. Note that these waste products created in lumber milling would normally end up in landfills.

For more information go here: http://www.yptalk.com/archive.cfm?ID=390&CatID=3

Harry J. Lerwill said...

A lot of people forget that the digital alternatives to Yellow Pages are reliant on both power supplies and data feeds. If the electricity is out, most home users will not have internet access. Even the mobile applications on smart phones require the power to be flowing at the cell tower.

The electricity can be off for days, the water rising around your feet, or the building in your area badly shaken by a natural disaster, the Yellow Pages Book will still work.

I’d love to see disaster planning guides in the local Yellow Pages. As part of the local communities, they are in a position to be far more specific in their advice than the national and state websites, which are far too generic.